crazy

538264_10150964770779863_1147176664_nIf you’re a regular in these parts, you’ll be familiar with my… shall we say… less than conventional ways. And, as this week’s episode of ‘Random stuff people were searching for when they landed here trivia!’ suggests, my readers are also just a little bit craa-aazy.

This week, people have been asking some of life’s most important and intriguing questions:

  • How should bullhorn handlebars be fitted? – Properly. By someone who knows what they are doing.
  • What is the expected lifetime of SKS Commuter mudguards? – Depends on how badly you abuse them, I suppose.
  • Schwalbe Kojak or Brompton Kojak? – Pssst… it’s the same tyre! The regular one has reflective tyre labels; do you really think the reflective strip on the Brompton version is worth the extra money??? Me neither.
  • Is Carrbrook a council estate? – Used to be, yeah.
  • What year is my Coventry Eagle? – I have NO idea, 1960s or 1970s probably.
  • Who makes Transporter Bumper trailer? – Raleigh, I think. Or, whichever Far East company builds stuff for Raleigh these days.

Right, with the mysteries of the universe finally solved, it’s on to some cycling related trivia. A couple of people this week have been asking about On One Midge handlebars and, having had a set for a little over a year, it’s probably high time I did a little report on them.

205302_10151055926794863_1096110797_nSo what’s the deal? Aren’t they just weird shaped road bars? Well, yes and no.

Essentially they are based on a road style bar in that they have flat tops and then drop down in the usual hooked shape. Naturally, they only suit road style brake levers (no, you can’t run flat bar type levers on them) and the internal diameter is big enough to accommodate bar end shifters.

But here’s the weird thing… or at least the first weird thing… they come with either a 25.4mm or 31.8mm clamp size; the likes of which you normally find on mountain bike stems [although many road bike stems now come with a 31.8mm clamp].

395814_10151077628534863_270717771_nThe other weird thing… or at least another of the weird things… is that angle which the drops are splayed out at. Why, WHY would they do this? Well, what you get with wider bars is more stability and (so those better and braver off road than I am tell me) the splay makes the brake levers more accessible when riding in the drops which apparently gives you the confidence to hammer downhill offroad at eye watering speeds.

You’ll notice however, the splay also places your brake levers at a rather strange angle. For me and my Cane Creek SCR-5 levers, this results in an unusually comfortable riding position, almost akin to that you get from aero bars. I do find myself riding on the tops most of the time but more recently, I’ve been making an effort to get down in the drops; it’s a little strange with all that extra width but it does make a nice change from the somewhat upright riding position I have on the Troll.

So, would I recommend them? Well, yes and also no.

  • For your regular common or garden road bike, they are all kinds of wrong.
  • Most mountain bikes will be set up with mountain bike brakes and derailleurs so consideration needs to be given to the types of levers and shifters you’ll need to buy to make it all work.
  • Cyclocross bikes tend to come with road style bars and integrated shifters & brake levers and are designed to hit the trails anyway so it should be a simple case of switching them over (you may need a different stem, remember).
  • Touring bikes like my Surly Troll are most suited, I think. All that extra width helps to give you more stability which is helpful when you’ve got stuff hanging off the bike in bags and / or on a trailer. There’s also plenty of room for fitting cross levers, lights and handlebar bags.

557294_10151077625149863_721584113_nMy personal opinion? I love the way they look on the bike, I love the way the bar end shifters are kept well away from my knees and I LOVE the way I can change gear with my little fingers when I’m riding in the drops. For me and my Troll, they work great even if they are so wide I have to lift the whole bike over narrow gates etc. but I suspect they are not for everyone.

553743_10150987700279863_347507007_nOh, and whilst we’re on the topic of craa-aazy things, we have a new contender for ‘Best search term EVER!’ with:

“weird things on woodhead pass”

Although that has to be closely followed by:

“public toilets woodhead pass”

That would be weird in such a rugged place!

two tribes

 

Steady, steady… control yoursleves… Hey! No pushing at the back!

Yes! YES! It’s Thursday again which can mean only one thing: it’s time for ‘random stuff people were searching for when they landed here trivia!’… I know, right?

Just like last week, there have been definite themes presenting themselves:

  • Originally, I was going to explore such marvels as:197736_10150987697709863_1220920617_n
    • “cycle route hadfield” – yes, it’s a little thing know as the Trans Pennine Trail.
    • “springfield close hadfield transpennine trail” – yes, it looks like there’s a path at the end of the road to access said trail
    • “longdale cycle track hadfield uk” – actually, it’s Longdendale trail.
    • “woodhead pass” – uh huh, that can be found at the end of the Longdendale trail, best of luck.
    • “trans pennine way in 3 days” – them’s fightin’ words… No, wait. It’s a walking trail across another part of t’ Pennines, never mind.

The Longdendale trail being a rather lovely, relaxed gravel path, we were going to enjoy ‘Gravel Pit’ by Wu Tang Clan but the lyrics are just far too rude!

  • So, instead, we’ll have a brief look into:182314_10151327133014863_677955864_n
    • “long haul trucker troll heavier” – yes, the Troll is much heavier than the Long Haul Trucker; at least my Troll is much heavier than my friend’s LHT.
    • “surly troll vs lht”
      • Now, that’s a good question! We’ve only done maybe 100 miles together on these two so a direct comparison will have to wait until later on this year when we take them on some kind of coast to coast tour (haven’t decided which route to take yet) but for now consider this:
        • They’re both touring bikes,
        • They both have rigid forks,
        • They’ll both handle a certain amount of off roading,
        • They’re both made by Surly so you know they’re awesome and highly versatile; you could do worse than own either of them (or both!).

Oh, I almost forgot! Somebody has asked us this week “can you ride a brompton bicycle off road?” – I have NO idea but I’m excited to find out! So, if you’re a Brompton owner and you read this blog (ahem, I’m looking at you, Northern Walker), please please please take it off road and let us know how it performs!