friends will be friends

Some time ago, I made the decision to buy myself a Surly Krampus. I’ve wanted one ever since I had the chance to ride an early demo (before they were available in the UK), so when the opportunity came up to bag a Krampus Ops frameset at a bargain price, I could hardly resist.

1463197_10154795386754863_7789395275549329617_nI’d been planning the build for a long time, and had picked out almost every component it was going to have, right down to the matching handlebar grips and saddle. It was going to set me back just shy of £2,500.

As it was, the frameset was ex-display (and therefore slightly cheaper than RRP), a friend was selling a wheelset with tyres and I had an assortment of other parts lying around in the garage. Even after splurging on a Hope rear hub and XT rear mech, the whole thing came in at around £1,200.

I also wanted to try out new things with this bike so I went for a 1×10 setup (a single chainring up front, and a 10 speed cassette on the rear wheel), with a really wide range cassette to still give me plenty of gearing options.

The Ops version of the Krampus comes with a rather clever interchangeable rear dropout system which allows you to run just about any setup from single speed / internal gear hub (IGH) to a standard quick release hub, to a bolt-through axle. I already have an IGH on my Surly Ogre and all my other bikes use standard quick release hubs, so I decided to experiment with the bolt-through option.

They tell me it stiffens the whole rear end up, allowing more of the effort you put in to be transmitted to actually driving the rear wheel (rather than being lost through flexing the frame). In practice, it certainly feels more solid bolting it all together, and when I’m riding the bike, it doesn’t seem to flex as much as other frames. I’ll have to try it out with a standard quick release axle on day to get a real comparison though.

12140687_10154798953009863_6949822147024172815_nThe build was simple enough, but not without its problems. When I first fitted the rear wheel and tightened the axle down, there was a significant lack of clearance between the brake disc rotor and the caliper mounting adaptor. As it turned out, the end caps that came with my axle were the wrong size, meaning there wasn’t the right amount of spacing between the end of the axle and the frame. One late-night emergency parts delivery from the amazingly helpful folks at Keep Pedalling, Manchester and all was good with the world!

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I must confess I haven’t been riding it as much as I’d planned to, but whenever I do, it makes me grin like an idiot and reminds me that I have some good friends. The kind of friends who will not only drive miles out of their way late at night to bring you an axle spacer, but will also be there to tear up the trails, and berate you for running too much pressure in your tyres.

Here’s me and my friend Rich, enjoying a group ride with some of the folks from Surly Bikes when they were last in the UK. If only we could get paid for mucking about on our bikes all day long.

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jumper

 

As you know, I like quirky things; the quirkier, the better in fact!

But, quirky isn’t always enough; stuff needs to work well too. I mean, look at Boris Johnson’s hair; it’s quirky as you like but what use is it, really?

Allow me to introduce you to the Surly Tuggnut.

Of course, it’s made by Surly so you know it’s going to be really well engineered, rock solid and will no doubt satisfy even your quirkiest of desires.

Designed primarily for single speed / fixed gear bikes, the whole point of the Tuggnut is to incrementally move the rear wheel back in horizontal ‘dropouts’ to achieve the all important correct chain tension without the need for an ugly derailleur or external chain device or some kind. With 2 separate axle mounting points and uber fine adjustment available from the little thumbscrew, finding the right position for your rear wheel is a snap. And, thanks to a neat little washer type attachment, you can also run quick release wheels just as easily as solid axles.

But wait, the Troll isn’t a single speed! Look, there’s a big old shiny cassette and a rather nice Shimano Deore Shadow rear derailleur there – what on earth do you need a Tuggnut for on a geared bike?

Well, the answer is simple. Because I’m running 2.2″ wide Halo Twin Rail tyres and a triple mountain bike chainset, whenever I’m climbing some horrendous hill in the little chainring and the biggest cog on the cassette, the trailing edge of my front derailleur *just* rubs on the outer edge of the rear tyre. It’s only about a half a millimeter, but it’s more than enough to need fixing. The only real solutions available were:

  1. Replace the bottom bracket for one with a longer axle – Not gonna happen, far too much trouble and far too expensive
  2. Replace the tyres for something skinnier – Not gonna happen, far too attached to my Halos and far too manly to run skinny tyres on the Troll
  3. Buy a Surly Tuggnut – Sold!

Available around the £25 range, the Tuggnut is hardly the most expensive bit of kit out there and the best news is, you only need one for the drive side of your bike! You can see here how much I managed to move the rear wheel back; not much, but just enough to avoid any more interference issues. You can also see in this shot the beauty of those sliding disc brake mounts; nothing more complicated here than loosening the bolts, sliding the caliper back a little and retightening the bolts.

So yes, the Surly Tuggnut works extremely well. And the quirk factor? Well, that’s brought to you by the fact it also doubles as a bottle opener! Yep, at the end of a long, hard day’s trolling about, you can even crack open a cold one at the side of the trail. Sweet.

While we’re on the subject of quirky, yet functional accessories for your Surly (and I believe there are other bike manufacturers out there), you could certainly do a lot worse than get yourself one of these.

Maybe I could get Karen to knit me an orange one…