in the army now

 

We’ve spent a lot of time recently talking about riding cool bikes, wanting to ride other cool bikes and what happens when you spend too long out with other women. I can see you all there, on the edges of your seats, holding your collective breath just waiting for an update on the much anticipated Surly Ogre build. Well, wait no more dear reader, the Ogre is finally experiencing life in the cycle lane.

Surly Ogre LHT Crumbals on the cornerSeen here enjoying a much needed break at the very excellent Crumbals on the corner in Marsden, Huddersfield, the eagle-eyed and elephant-brained regulars amongst you may well recognise the On One Midge bars, Cane Creek SCR-5 brake levers and Avid BB5 road disc brakes from early iterations of my Surly Troll.

I’ve also pinched the Brooks B17 World Traveller special edition saddle from my Troll which has started to turn a lovely orangey-brown colour which, whilst not an exact match, works extremely well with the brown Deda bar tape, brown Vavert full wrap mudguards and army green frameset.

Surly Ogre 1The Ogre shares the same horizontal track style dropouts found on the Troll which allow you to slide the rear wheel back and forth to achieve just the right position and, crucially with single speed and internal gear hub (IGH) setups, the right amount of chain tension. I’m almost embarrased to admit that mine was all floppy on chrimbo day.

You see, I was relying on the force applied by simply tightening the axle nuts to keep my rear wheel in place. What I hadn’t realised was that with all the out-the-saddle climbing I’d been doing, the force I was putting through the drivetrain was enough to cause the wheel to slip forward in the dropouts. Not much, but enough to achieve said floppyness.

There are a few potential solutions to this:

  1. Stop riding up hills
  2. Fit some kind of spring loaded chain tensioner
  3. Sling a Surly Tuggnut on

Living in t’ North as I do and given the fact I actually really enjoying climbing (despite my complaining), option 1 really isn’t an option.

Option 2 is out too because it’s nonsense to have sliding dropouts and a derailleur style chain tensioner, besides which I want to retain the clean look.

So, option 3 it is.

Surly Ogre dropout Alfine 8 non turn washerBut wait! Because of how the Alfine hub works, you need to install special non-turn washers which of course aren’t designed to work with the Surly Tuggnut (other inferior chain tensioners are also available). Punch “Surly Tuggnut Alfine” into your search engine of choice and there is plenty of discussion on the forums about how to modify your Tuggnut to work. My favourite solution and the one I ended up going with was really the simplest: just throw away one of your non turn washers.

Surly Ogre Alfine 8 Sturmey Archer crankset Blackspire chainringAs it turns out, you really only need one to do the job of holding the axle in place – taken care of by the left hand (white) one in the picture above. On the drive side of the bike, simply remove the sliver washer, fit your Surly Tuggnut as normal, snug up the thumbscrew to achieve the all important chain tension and hey presto, nothing floppy in sight and you’ve got the ability to crack open a cold one at the end of your ride thanks to the built in bottle opener. Sweet.

It’s important to note here that there are various different coloured non turn washers for the various different shaped dropouts out there and unless you have true horizontal ones like mine, this solution really isn’t for you. I dare say it’s not recommended by Shimano to run your Alfine with only one non turn washer and I’m fairly sure the good folk at Surly wouldn’t recommend any of the above with the probable exception of drinking beer.

Remember kids, read and follow the manufacturers’ instructions [sic].

Surly Ogre Alfine 8 Jtek bar end shifterShifting comes courtesy of a Jtek bar end shifter. Not the one I ordered direct from The States, waited ages for, waited a bit longer for, got tired of waiting for and cancelled, but one I bought second hand from a guy who knows a guy who knows a guy who had one lying around in his parts box. With reassuringly industrial indexing at the shifter (not the hub), there is a very satisfying click every time you change gear and none of the imprecise feel I’m told you get with the Rohloff which is indexed at the hub, not the shifter.

Surly Ogre Alfine 8 Tuggnut casette jointSurly Ogre in line cable adjusterThe Alfine hub is particualrly sensitive to gear cable tension, thanks largely to the decidedly el cheapo plastic the ‘cassette joint’ is made from. Once installed, you need to shift to the lowest gear (1), attach the cable inner to the fiddly little cable clamp and pop it into place. Next, shift to gear 4 and you’ll see two little marks in a small window in the cassette joint. The game now is to get them both perfectly lined up. I’m reliably informed this is damn near impossible without the help of an in-line cable adjuster; which is why I didn’t question it and fitted one up near the shifter (it doesn’t really matter where you install it, just so long as you have one somewhere accessible).

You’re going to want to take care of all your chain tension and other rear wheel movement and get it tightened down in its final position before you go anywhere near the cable tension, incidentally. Of course, every time you whip the wheel out for a puncture, tyre change or whatever, make doubly sure to re-check your gear cable tension because I guarantee you it won’t be right (another reason for the Tuggnut – the wheel always goes back in exactly the same place).

Surly Ogre Shimano Alfine ChainsetOh, I almost forgot! Originally I’d planned to fit a Shimano Alfine chainset to match the wheelset but it turned out to be suitable only for 68mm bottom bracket shells and I have a 73mm shell on the Ogre. The solution came in the shape of a Sturmey Archer single speed chainset and traditional square taper bottom bracket – nothin’ fancy. You’ll see on the first couple of pictures on this post that it originally came with a 44t chainring and what turns out to be a nasty silver chain guard; coupled with the 18t rear cog I ended up using, this resulted in gearing that is just a bit too high for my liking.

Surly Ogre Sturmey Archer crannkset 39t Blackspire downhill chainringIn t’ hills I find myself almost exclusively out of the saddle and even hooning down a long descent with the wind behind me, I still can’t make any real use of the 2 highest gears. Not wanting to go through the hassle or expense of sourcing yet another chainset, I simply ordered a new, smaller chainring (104mm BCD for the nerds out there) and took a link out of my chain so I’m now running with a rather fancy looking Blackspire 39t Downhill chainring up front and an 18t cog in the rear. I’ll be heading out on it tomorrow to test out the new combination which will hopefully give me a good balance of high speed on the flats and relatively low gearing on the climbs.

Well, I think that’s about all there is to report for now – more in the next few weeks!

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where i sleep

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There’s a definite theme to this week’s ‘Random stuff people were searching for when they landed here trivia!’… funny how that happens.

Yes, this week we’ve had some gems as:

  • BOB Nutz Surly
  • twin wheel transporter trailer weight empty
  • BOB trailer with horizontal dropouts
  • I’m starting to live in my cargo trailer (my personal favourite)

Yes, this week it’s all about the humble cargo trailer and the somewhat eccentric people who own and love them… it almost feels like I should be narrating a late night TV show on Channel 4.

As you can see, I’m no stranger to bicycle trailers and I’ve put my time in with both of the main types; single wheel and twin wheel. I’ve ridden with them on road, off road, along dedicated cycle routes and through busy city traffic. I’ve had them loaded up with everything from scrumped apples to camping gear & clothes to a new wheelset to a vintage bike.

I’ve towed a trailer in relentless heat, freezing cold, pouring rain and strong winds. I’ve towed on the flat, up hills and down dales. Heck, I’ve even been known to take my trailer to work on my morning commute.

So, which is best? Well, very much like my thoughts on DMR Moto vs Halo Twin Rail tyres, I think it really comes down to the kind of riding you want to do:

  • Find yourself mainly cycling on nice, flat surfaces with plenty of room around you? Not too worried about the contents of your trailer coming into contact with the elements? No obstacles too narrow to navigate on your ride?
    • If you’ve answered “yes” to most of these, chances are you’re a fairly relaxed cyclist and you use your trailer mainly for pootling down to the supermarket or taking a picnic to the park.
    • For you, I am recommending the twin wheel type trailer. This is because they’re relatively cheap, don’t require any particularly complex hardware to fit to your bike and really don’t affect the handling of the bike too much.
    • There are some cons, however; by way of their design, they are naturally wider than your bike which means you need to take care when navigating narrow passages etc. Also, the trailer will want to cut in when you turn so a little extra turning circle is required.
    • Oh, and the one I used was just about as waterproof as your average colander so you’ll need to be OK with your belongings getting wet should it rain.
  • After a trailer to use on a regular basis, be it for your business, touring around the world, or just carrying stuff and things from here to there?
    • If so, I’m recommending for you the single wheel type trailer, like my BOB Yak.
    • Thanks to their design, most single wheel trailers are not much (if any) wider than the bike you’re towing them with. Mounting hardware normally comes in the shape of a replacement quick release skewer or axle nuts so fitting really shouldn’t be too difficult.
    • The major benefits for me are the aerodynamic advantage you get from the trailer hiding behind the bike (a huge advantage over panniers too, by the way) and the fact the trailer simply follows the bike in an arc so you don’t need to worry about your turning circle at all.
    • There are cons, of course. This type of trailer is not cheap… mine came in around the £350 mark but it did come with all the fittings I needed, a waterproof sack and the peace of mind that it’ll hold its value should I ever decide to sell it on.

There are plenty of other considerations too… riding off road really sucks with a twin wheel trailer and, because the single wheel ones mount from both sides of the rear axle, they do tend to have a steering effect on the bike.

Also, there’s the push-me-pull-you that comes with having any kind of weight hanging off the back of the bike and what we shall refer to today simply as ‘The Redditch Incident’… more on that another time.

This year, I’ll be touring not with my trailer but front & rear panniers so keep your eyes peeled for a direct comparison of the 2 options; in the meantime, I think this picture best explains the love / hate relationship I have with my Yak.

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girls, girls, girls

 

Being the lazy, no good civil servant I am, I haven’t been at work since some time back in late December; even then, I wasn’t really working… In any event, I’ve completely lost track of who I am and what day it is but those in the know tell me it’s Thursday today which can mean only one thing!

Yes, it’s time for yet another round of:

Random stuff people were searching for when they landed here trivia!

Please, try to contain your excitement.

As ever, I’ve been inundated with questions and keywords this week and here are my favourites:

  • “will a washer stop axle sliding in horizontal dropouts?”
  • “can you fit a BOB Yak to a bike with disc brakes?”
  • “do bullhorn bars fit any fixie?”
  • “Schwalbe Kojak tyre pressure”
  • “Surly Troll image”
  • “leather girl on bike porn”
    • Wait. What?
  • “spandex bodysuit see through wet messy”
    • Dude, you’re clearly looking in the wrong place.

A fairly obscure selection this week, I’m sure you’ll agree! Perhaps it’s high time I went back to work…

In other news, keep your eyes peeled over the next few days for a review of my custom wheelset I had built by the good people over at Keep Pedalling, Manchester.

jumper

 

As you know, I like quirky things; the quirkier, the better in fact!

But, quirky isn’t always enough; stuff needs to work well too. I mean, look at Boris Johnson’s hair; it’s quirky as you like but what use is it, really?

Allow me to introduce you to the Surly Tuggnut.

Of course, it’s made by Surly so you know it’s going to be really well engineered, rock solid and will no doubt satisfy even your quirkiest of desires.

Designed primarily for single speed / fixed gear bikes, the whole point of the Tuggnut is to incrementally move the rear wheel back in horizontal ‘dropouts’ to achieve the all important correct chain tension without the need for an ugly derailleur or external chain device or some kind. With 2 separate axle mounting points and uber fine adjustment available from the little thumbscrew, finding the right position for your rear wheel is a snap. And, thanks to a neat little washer type attachment, you can also run quick release wheels just as easily as solid axles.

But wait, the Troll isn’t a single speed! Look, there’s a big old shiny cassette and a rather nice Shimano Deore Shadow rear derailleur there – what on earth do you need a Tuggnut for on a geared bike?

Well, the answer is simple. Because I’m running 2.2″ wide Halo Twin Rail tyres and a triple mountain bike chainset, whenever I’m climbing some horrendous hill in the little chainring and the biggest cog on the cassette, the trailing edge of my front derailleur *just* rubs on the outer edge of the rear tyre. It’s only about a half a millimeter, but it’s more than enough to need fixing. The only real solutions available were:

  1. Replace the bottom bracket for one with a longer axle – Not gonna happen, far too much trouble and far too expensive
  2. Replace the tyres for something skinnier – Not gonna happen, far too attached to my Halos and far too manly to run skinny tyres on the Troll
  3. Buy a Surly Tuggnut – Sold!

Available around the £25 range, the Tuggnut is hardly the most expensive bit of kit out there and the best news is, you only need one for the drive side of your bike! You can see here how much I managed to move the rear wheel back; not much, but just enough to avoid any more interference issues. You can also see in this shot the beauty of those sliding disc brake mounts; nothing more complicated here than loosening the bolts, sliding the caliper back a little and retightening the bolts.

So yes, the Surly Tuggnut works extremely well. And the quirk factor? Well, that’s brought to you by the fact it also doubles as a bottle opener! Yep, at the end of a long, hard day’s trolling about, you can even crack open a cold one at the side of the trail. Sweet.

While we’re on the subject of quirky, yet functional accessories for your Surly (and I believe there are other bike manufacturers out there), you could certainly do a lot worse than get yourself one of these.

Maybe I could get Karen to knit me an orange one…

don’t stop me now

 

Part of me always knew the Troll wouldn’t be put together in just a couple of days. I was optimistic that maybe, just maybe, everything would just bolt together and work perfectly; alas, that’s just not the way with custom bikes. Particularly if you’re obsessive about these things; like I am.

One of the things that has gone well with the 2nd stage of the build: The new 11-34 Shimano Deore cassette arrived and looks great with the 160mm disc on the other side of the rear hub and, now the rear wheel is in the frame, I see no good reason why it needs to come out again in the foreseeable future. Oh, by the way, if you’re planning your own Surly Troll (or Ogre) build with full wrap mudguards, you’ll need to undo the lower mudguard mounts to be able to get the wheel out thanks to those horizontal ‘dropouts’.

Also working out beautifully was the installation of the bottom bracket and chainset. I had these lying around from a previous mountain bike build and, quite frankly, I just love them. I remember the Race Face bottom bracket setting me back £60 once upon a time and, do you know what, it was worth every single penny. The chainset with gorgeous Race Face chainrings was an eBay bargain and, despite the overall colour scheme being orange and black, I think the silver crank arms actually look really nice.

Front & rear derailleurs are brought to you by the Shimano Deore Shadow range and fit really neatly to the frame with some rather clever cable routing designed to avoid bits of trailside foliage, small children and the like from getting caught as you ride along. Again, these were lying around from the aforementioned mountain bike which just happened to have a different diameter seat tube than the Surly. Do I still have the correct shims for fitting the front derailleur? Of course I don’t! Happily, Rich over at Keep Pedalling had the ones I needed lying around in his parts box.

Next up is the dreaded job of cutting the steerer tube down to length. Now, this is a job that really shouldn’t be attempted if you don’t have the right tools, the right knowledge or a large pair of balls; once you’ve cut it off, you’ll struggle to stick it back on again so my advice here is to always, ALWAYS err on the side of caution and leave more than you need because you can always take a little more off if you need to. For me, that meant 20mm of spacers below the stem and then an additional 10mm spacer above the stem to give me a little bit of tolerance (even though I knew full well I’d never need it). So, once you have all your spacers and stem in place and you’re confident the headset is nicely seated against the crown race, mark the steerer tube above the upper spacer with a sharp flat-bladed screwdriver or something similar to give you a line to cut to. And, as the great Norm Abram would say “Measure twice, cut once”.

With the upper spacer removed, you can see the litte mark left by the screwdriver blade. Removing the wheel from the fork, the fork from the frame and putting all the little loose bits of the headset somewhere clean, I lined up my specialist saw clamp against the mark I’d made and then wriggled it down the steerer about 3mm; the reason for this is that you don’t want your top cap resting on the the very top of the cut steerer, rather you want about a 3mm gap. More on all that in a dedicated ‘How to…’ blog entry a bit later on.

And so, the moment of truth. With that little bit of excess steerer tuibe cut off and the star fangled nut installed (another ‘How to…’ blog entry and more specialist tools required here), I went ahead and cannibalised my poor old Merida for its bars, stem and shifters. Now, I know what you’re thinking: drop bars, bar end shifters, mountain bike gearing, disc brakes and fat road tyres??? Well, yes. Surly has never been conventional and neither have I. Have a little faith, it’s all going to work. I think.

Now, the reason why this blog entry isn’t ending up with the fully completed bike is simply down to the brakes. Like the derailleurs and chainset, the Avid BBDB (precursor of the legendary BB7) calipers came from my old mountain bike and are, sadly, shot. Which means the Cane Creek Drop V brake levers which were eye-wateringly expensive are about as useful as a chocolate fireguard.

Cue another not-so-good-for-my-mental-state 5 minutes.

Ah well, that’s custom bikes for you.

The solution: I bagged a pair of Avid BB5 Road calipers for… well, a less eye-watering price which are winging their way from the US as we speak. What this means for the rather sad looking Merida is that it’ll also now be losing its Cane Creek SCR-5 brake levers too and I’ve decided to go completely off the wall and fit a massive 203mm disc to the fork (also winging its way as we speak) so I should be able to throw myself (and probably a fully loaded BOB Yak) over the bars with the application of just 2 fingers. Yay!